Skip to main content

Full text of "The manufacture and properties of iron and steel"

See other formats


THE UNITED STATES.
469
TABLE XXII-tf. Production of Pig-Iron and Steel in Pennsylvania in 1903.
County.	Rolled Iron & Steel.		Steel Ingots.		Pig Iron.	
	Tons.	Per cent, of total.	Tons.	Per cent, of total.	Tons.	Per cent, of total.
Allegheny . . ............	4,860,903 568,283 466,951 332,366 323,585 309,198 257,743 158,091 131,895 86,543 85,043 74,561 51,974	59.94 7.01 5.76 4.10 3.98 3.81 3.18 1.95 1.63 1.07 1.05 0.92 0.64	5,530,520 804,633 439,662 197,111 372,475 360,369 188,125 2,414 65,939	67.06 9.76 5.33 2.39 4.52 4.37 2.28 0.03 0.80	4,291,671 611,328 337,587 276,649	52.46  7.47  ' 4.13 3.38
Cambria ................						
Dauphin ................						
Montgomery ...........						
						
Lawrence .............					457,979 54,994 254,549 595,147 386,872 132,351	5.60 0.67 3.11 7.27 4.73 1.63
Westmoreland .........						
Berks ...................						
Mercer ............. .....						
Lehigh ..................						
Lebanon . ...............						
Philadelphia ......... : .			68,400 107,523	6.83 1.30		
Northampton ...........					213,274 127,787 441,464	2.61 1.56 5.39
Bedford .................						
Others ...................	402,998	4.96	110,207	1.33		
Total ................						
	8,109,133	100.00	8,247,377	100.00	8,181,652	100.00
						
of all the pig-iron made in Ohio and over half of all the steel. Some pig-iron goes to Pittsburgh., while the furnaces of Southeastern Ohio ship considerable quantities to the steel plants of West Virginia. In any other part of the world districts like these would stand alone, but they are overshadowed by Allegheny County in Pennsylvania, which in 1903 produced 4,300,000 tons of pig-iron and 5,500,000 tons of steel. One-half of this steel is made in acid converters and half in basic open-hearth furnaces.
The foundation of this industry lies in the coal fields of the Con-ne]lsville district, in the counties of Westmoreland and Fayette in Pennsylvania, and the whole district including this section is approximately 80 miles square. Throughout this area the conditions are practically uniform, the ore supply coming by water from Lake Superior to some Lake Brie port, and thence by rail. The plants near the coal must haul the ore farther, while the plants near Lake Erie have a longer distance to bring the coke. In the case of finished products the difference in freight is trifling on shipments to distant points. It would be difficult to explain the reasons for locating each works at the particular place where it is built. In the immediate vicinity of Pittsburgh, about every piece of level ground is taken that lies along the river front. The country is very rugged and suitable sites for large steel works are not numer-